Book Review: To Treasure an Heiress by Roseanna M. White (The Secrets of the Isles #2)

About This Book-

1906

Beth Tremayne has always been drawn to adventure. During her childhood, she fed that desire by exploring every inch of the Isles of Scilly. Now, after stumbling across an old collection of letters and a map buried on her family’s property, she’s found more adventure than she ever anticipated in the hunt for pirate treasure. But in order to discover where the clues lead, she must search alongside Lord Sheridan, a man she finds insufferable.

Sheridan has spent years pursuing whatever archaeological interests pique his imagination. And when he discovers that Beth’s search connects with one of his far-removed pirate ancestors, he can’t help getting involved. Plus, he finds her irresistible, even though she insists he stole a prized possession of hers.

As they work together following different clues and drawing closer to danger, they start to piece together a story of tragic love and piratical adventure. But which treasure will bring the greatest surprise–the one they find in each other or the one just out of their reach?

My Review-

Similar Reviews-

One of my favorite things about Roseanna M. White’s books is how unique the settings and plots always are, and this book was no exception! This book was super unique: we were introduced to life on the Sicilian Isles, but this book delves deeper into that setting.

This book follows Beth, who has been looking for pirate treasure that has been rumored to exist around the island for years. It becomes more and more obvious that people are looking for this treasure and that she is on the right track, but no one is sure if the treasure even exists at all! At the same time, Sheridan is also invested in finding this treasure, but he is just pursuing it because of his own interest. Beth doesn’t trust Sheridan, but their research interests are so similar that they end up working together very closely, and they eventually fall in love.

My main gripe with this book is that it is utterly unmemorable: I distinctly remember enjoying the story while I was reading it, but I have truly no memory of what my favorite parts of it were, nor do I remember most of the plot points. I really liked the setting, and the background characters were really lovely: Mamm-wynn and Emily and Ainsley.

Beth was a really nice character and had a really nice personality, as well as a character arc that was interesting to follow. I really liked the enemies-to-lovers relationship she had with Sheridan, and their banter was very witty and very fun. I really liked Sheridan as a character: he had some struggles with his faith, but he stated the reasons why he doubted clearly and honestly. He never stopped pursuing his faith, and–my favorite part–called out Christians for making Christianity uninteresting and unappealing. His insistent pursuit of Beth left a bit of a nasty taste in my mouth, but aside from that, I really liked his character.

The secondary character arc, regarding Senara and her being taken advantage of by a man, was much heavier and I appreciated the discussion. I think there could have been a bit more nuanced discussion, but it was overall handled tactfully and Biblically.

Overall, I enjoyed this book! There weren’t any parts that particularly stuck out to me, but it was a pleasant read.

How strange were regrets. So many things she hated, yet without them, things she loved would never have been.

My Rating-

3/5

I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book which I received from the author. All views expressed are only my honest opinion; I was not required to write a positive review.

Advertisement

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.